All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 87 46 7
PDF Downloads 40 20 7

An Observational Study of Splitting Convective Clouds

Howard B. BluesteinSchool of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma

Search for other papers by Howard B. Bluestein in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Eugene W. McCaul Jr.School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma

Search for other papers by Eugene W. McCaul Jr. in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Gregory P. ByrdSchool of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma

Search for other papers by Gregory P. Byrd in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Robert L. WalkoCooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies (CIMMS), Norman, Oklahoma

Search for other papers by Robert L. Walko in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Robert Davies-JonesNational Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma

Search for other papers by Robert Davies-Jones in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

This is a case study of deep, but narrow convective towers which split twice into right- and left-moving components in southwestern Oklahoma on 28 May 1985. Our analysis makes use of storm-intercept visual documentation, mobile soundings, surface mesonetwork data, and frequent soundings from special sites. The data show that the convective towers behaved in many respects like low-precipitation storms, having formed in an environment of large CAPE and moderately strong unidirectional shear. The observation of towers splitting even when there is no heavy precipitation at the surface implies that rain processes are not crucial to the splitting phenomenon. The tiny storms were confined to a region northeast of a surface cyclone and low-pressure area, near the intersection of the dryline and an old outflow boundary, where convective temperature was reached. Evidence is presented that the moist layer was deepened locally just prior to convective initiation, and that the deepening was related to low-level convergence associated with the westward motion of the dryline.

Abstract

This is a case study of deep, but narrow convective towers which split twice into right- and left-moving components in southwestern Oklahoma on 28 May 1985. Our analysis makes use of storm-intercept visual documentation, mobile soundings, surface mesonetwork data, and frequent soundings from special sites. The data show that the convective towers behaved in many respects like low-precipitation storms, having formed in an environment of large CAPE and moderately strong unidirectional shear. The observation of towers splitting even when there is no heavy precipitation at the surface implies that rain processes are not crucial to the splitting phenomenon. The tiny storms were confined to a region northeast of a surface cyclone and low-pressure area, near the intersection of the dryline and an old outflow boundary, where convective temperature was reached. Evidence is presented that the moist layer was deepened locally just prior to convective initiation, and that the deepening was related to low-level convergence associated with the westward motion of the dryline.

Save