Polarimetric Measurements in a Severe Hailstorm

View More View Less
  • 1 National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 2 Department of Electrical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • | 3 Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India
  • | 4 Communications and Space Sciences Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
  • | 5 Department of Electrical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins. Colorado
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

This study explores the utility of polarimetric measurements for discriminating between hydrometeor types with the emphasis on (a) hail detection and discrimination of its size, (b) measurement of heavy precipitation, (c) identification and quantification of mixed-phase hydrometeors, and (d) discrimination of ice forms. In particular, we examine the specific differential phase, the backscatter differential phase, the correlation coefficient between vertically and horizontally polarized waves, and the differential reflectivity, collected from a storm at close range. Three range–height cross sections are analyzed together with complementary data from a prototype WSR-88D radar. The case is interesting because it demonstrates the complementary nature of these polarimetric measurands. Self-consistency among them allows qualitative and some quantitative discrimination between hydrometeors.

Abstract

This study explores the utility of polarimetric measurements for discriminating between hydrometeor types with the emphasis on (a) hail detection and discrimination of its size, (b) measurement of heavy precipitation, (c) identification and quantification of mixed-phase hydrometeors, and (d) discrimination of ice forms. In particular, we examine the specific differential phase, the backscatter differential phase, the correlation coefficient between vertically and horizontally polarized waves, and the differential reflectivity, collected from a storm at close range. Three range–height cross sections are analyzed together with complementary data from a prototype WSR-88D radar. The case is interesting because it demonstrates the complementary nature of these polarimetric measurands. Self-consistency among them allows qualitative and some quantitative discrimination between hydrometeors.

Save