A Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Outflow Layer of Supertyphoon Flo (1990)

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  • 1 Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
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Abstract

Isentropic coordinate analyses of rawinsondes and cloud motion wind vectors derived from geostationary satellite imagery are employed to describe the three-dimensional upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric circulation attending western North Pacific Supertyphoon Flo during September 1990. Outflow from the storm is concentrated in several evolving channels in the horizontal. In terms of vertical structure, net outflow evaluated at 6° latitude (666 km) radius is found to occur at higher levels and over an increasing range of potential temperature θ as the tropical cyclone intensifies. Outflow on the equatorward side of the tropical cyclone tends to occur at greater θ values (higher altitudes) than poleward outflow. Potential vorticity also decreases within the corresponding isentropic layers associated with the outflow. The implications of the vertical variability of outflow structure in terms of the interactions between storm and environment, and effects on storm structural changes, are considered briefly.

Abstract

Isentropic coordinate analyses of rawinsondes and cloud motion wind vectors derived from geostationary satellite imagery are employed to describe the three-dimensional upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric circulation attending western North Pacific Supertyphoon Flo during September 1990. Outflow from the storm is concentrated in several evolving channels in the horizontal. In terms of vertical structure, net outflow evaluated at 6° latitude (666 km) radius is found to occur at higher levels and over an increasing range of potential temperature θ as the tropical cyclone intensifies. Outflow on the equatorward side of the tropical cyclone tends to occur at greater θ values (higher altitudes) than poleward outflow. Potential vorticity also decreases within the corresponding isentropic layers associated with the outflow. The implications of the vertical variability of outflow structure in terms of the interactions between storm and environment, and effects on storm structural changes, are considered briefly.

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