Finite-Wavelength Instabilities of a Coupled Density Front

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

Finite-wavelength instabilities of a coupled density front with zero potential vorticity are found for the single-layer and the two-layer problems. These instabilities result from the resonance between two distinct waves whose real phase speeds coalesce. In the single-layer problem, the range of wavenumbers over which the coalescence takes place decreases with increasing wavenumber; consequently, the instability exponents and the growth rates also decrease. For shallow lower layers, the coalescence range increases with increasing wavenumber; at large wavenumbers, the coalescence range becomes continuous, while the instability exponent is approaching a constant value. The growth rate in the two-layer problem increases, therefore, linearly with wavenumber and the short waves fastest. These short-wave instabilities are qualitatively reminiscent of small-scale features along coastal fronts and in laboratory experiments.

Abstract

Finite-wavelength instabilities of a coupled density front with zero potential vorticity are found for the single-layer and the two-layer problems. These instabilities result from the resonance between two distinct waves whose real phase speeds coalesce. In the single-layer problem, the range of wavenumbers over which the coalescence takes place decreases with increasing wavenumber; consequently, the instability exponents and the growth rates also decrease. For shallow lower layers, the coalescence range increases with increasing wavenumber; at large wavenumbers, the coalescence range becomes continuous, while the instability exponent is approaching a constant value. The growth rate in the two-layer problem increases, therefore, linearly with wavenumber and the short waves fastest. These short-wave instabilities are qualitatively reminiscent of small-scale features along coastal fronts and in laboratory experiments.

Save