Evaluating the Impact of RAFS Changes on the NGM-Based MOS Guidance

Mary C. Erickson Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development NWS/NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland

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J. Brent Bower Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development NWS/NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland

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Valery J. Dagostaro Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development NWS/NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland

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J. Paul Dallavalle Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development NWS/NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland

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Eli Jacks Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development NWS/NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland

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John S. Jensenius Jr. Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development NWS/NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland

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James C. Su Techniques Development Laboratory, Office of Systems Development NWS/NOAA Silver Spring, Maryland

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Abstract

In the spring of 1990, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) tested several modifications to the Regional Analysis and Forecast System (RAFS). In order to compare the proposed version of the RAFS to the current operational RAFS, NMC ran both systems in parallel for a 4-week period. Simultaneously, the Techniques Development Laboratory (TDL) applied the operational RAFS-based Model Output Statistics (MOS) equations to output from both the operational and proposed (parallel) versions of the Nested Grid Model (NGM) to generate two sets of MOS forecasts. Our goal was to determine the impact of RAFS modifications on the NGM MOS forecasts. At the end of the 4-week test period, we verified both the operational and parallel NGM MOS forecasts. Virtually no differences in accuracy or skill existed between the operational and parallel MOS forecasts of max/min temperature, probability of precipitation, and surface wind. The skill of the cloud amount forecasts, however, deteriorated significantly. The NGM 300-mb relative humidity field changed markedly as a result of the RAFS modifications, and this change affected the cloud forecasts. Since the cloud cover forecasts were the only NGM MOS products adversely impacted by the new parallel RAFS, we rederived the cloud equations without the 300-mb relative humidity. These equations were implemented operationally in September 1990. When the new RAFS is implemented, we expect that the impact on the current NGM MOS guidance will be minimal.

Abstract

In the spring of 1990, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) tested several modifications to the Regional Analysis and Forecast System (RAFS). In order to compare the proposed version of the RAFS to the current operational RAFS, NMC ran both systems in parallel for a 4-week period. Simultaneously, the Techniques Development Laboratory (TDL) applied the operational RAFS-based Model Output Statistics (MOS) equations to output from both the operational and proposed (parallel) versions of the Nested Grid Model (NGM) to generate two sets of MOS forecasts. Our goal was to determine the impact of RAFS modifications on the NGM MOS forecasts. At the end of the 4-week test period, we verified both the operational and parallel NGM MOS forecasts. Virtually no differences in accuracy or skill existed between the operational and parallel MOS forecasts of max/min temperature, probability of precipitation, and surface wind. The skill of the cloud amount forecasts, however, deteriorated significantly. The NGM 300-mb relative humidity field changed markedly as a result of the RAFS modifications, and this change affected the cloud forecasts. Since the cloud cover forecasts were the only NGM MOS products adversely impacted by the new parallel RAFS, we rederived the cloud equations without the 300-mb relative humidity. These equations were implemented operationally in September 1990. When the new RAFS is implemented, we expect that the impact on the current NGM MOS guidance will be minimal.

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