The Design and Testing of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System

View More View Less
  • 1 Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Atmospheric Directorate, Monterey, California
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

The Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) has proven itself to be competitive with any of the large forecast models run by the large operational forecast centers around the world. The navy depends on NOGAPS for an astonishingly wide range of applications, from ballistic winds in the stratosphere to air-sea fluxes to drive ocean general circulation models. Users of these applications will benefit from a better understanding of how a system such as NOGAPS is developed, what physical assumptions and compromises have been made, and what they can reasonably expect in the future as the system continues to evolve.

The discussions will be equally relevant for users of products from other large forecast centers, e.g., National Meteorological Center, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. There is little difference in the scientific basis of the models and the development methodologies used for their development. However, the operational priorities of each center and their computer hardware and software environments often dictate what compromises are made and how model-based research is conducted. In this paper, NOGAPS will serve as the basis for discussing these issues and the art of numerical weather prediction model development.

Abstract

The Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) has proven itself to be competitive with any of the large forecast models run by the large operational forecast centers around the world. The navy depends on NOGAPS for an astonishingly wide range of applications, from ballistic winds in the stratosphere to air-sea fluxes to drive ocean general circulation models. Users of these applications will benefit from a better understanding of how a system such as NOGAPS is developed, what physical assumptions and compromises have been made, and what they can reasonably expect in the future as the system continues to evolve.

The discussions will be equally relevant for users of products from other large forecast centers, e.g., National Meteorological Center, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. There is little difference in the scientific basis of the models and the development methodologies used for their development. However, the operational priorities of each center and their computer hardware and software environments often dictate what compromises are made and how model-based research is conducted. In this paper, NOGAPS will serve as the basis for discussing these issues and the art of numerical weather prediction model development.

Save