The Use of a Two-Dimensional, Time-Dependent Cloud Model to Predict Convective and Stratiform Clouds and Precipitation

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  • 1 Institute of Atmospheric Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, South Dakota
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Abstract

A two-dimensional, time-dependent cloud model has been used in two field projects to forecast the convective development during the day from the morning sounding. In effect, the cloud model gives a dynamic analysis of the sounding as affected by heating and evaporation at the earth's surface, divergence of the winds throughout the atmosphere, and cloud shadow effects. During the initial project, the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment, the results were mixed. Model runs were easily made when soundings were available, but displaying the results in a meaningful and useful way was the limiting factor. In a later experiment, the North Dakota Thunderstorm Project, the problem of displaying results was overcome and soundings were available from the local weather service forecast office with a high degree of reliability. The experimental model correctly forecasts convective development about 80% of the time, and precipitation or no precipitation more than 70% of the time.

Abstract

A two-dimensional, time-dependent cloud model has been used in two field projects to forecast the convective development during the day from the morning sounding. In effect, the cloud model gives a dynamic analysis of the sounding as affected by heating and evaporation at the earth's surface, divergence of the winds throughout the atmosphere, and cloud shadow effects. During the initial project, the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment, the results were mixed. Model runs were easily made when soundings were available, but displaying the results in a meaningful and useful way was the limiting factor. In a later experiment, the North Dakota Thunderstorm Project, the problem of displaying results was overcome and soundings were available from the local weather service forecast office with a high degree of reliability. The experimental model correctly forecasts convective development about 80% of the time, and precipitation or no precipitation more than 70% of the time.

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