A Progress Report on the Development of the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh Ensemble

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  • 1 Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
  • 2 NOAA/Global Systems Laboratory, Boulder, CO
  • 3 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University, Boulder, CO
  • 4 National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO
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Abstract

The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh Ensemble (HRRRE) is a 36-member ensemble analysis system with nine forecast members that utilizes the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARW-WRF) dynamic core and the physics suite from the operational Rapid Refresh/High-Resolution Rapid Refresh deterministic modeling system. A goal of HRRRE development is a system with sufficient spread amongst members, comparable in magnitude to the random error in the ensemble mean, to represent the range of possible future atmospheric states. HRRRE member diversity has traditionally been obtained by perturbing the initial and lateral boundary conditions of each member, but recent development has focused on implementing stochastic approaches in HRRRE to generate additional spread. These techniques were tested in retrospective experiments and in the May 2019 Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Experiment (HWT-SE). Results show a 6–25% increase in the ensemble spread in 2-m temperature, 2-m mixing ratio, and 10-m wind speed when stochastic parameter perturbations are used in HRRRE (HRRRE-SPP). Case studies from HWT-SE demonstrate that HRRRE-SPP performed similar to or better than the operational High-Resolution Ensemble Forecast system version 2 (HREFv2) and the non-stochastic HRRRE. However, subjective evaluations provided by HWT-SE forecasters indicated that overall, HRRRE-SPP predicted lower probabilities of severe weather (using updraft helicity as a proxy) compared to HREFv2. A statistical analysis of the performance of HRRRE-SPP and HREFv2 from the 2019 summer convective season supports this claim, but also demonstrates that the two systems have similar reliability for prediction of severe weather using updraft helicity.

Denotes content that is immediately available upon publication as open access.

Corresponding author email address: evan.kalina@noaa.gov

Abstract

The High-Resolution Rapid Refresh Ensemble (HRRRE) is a 36-member ensemble analysis system with nine forecast members that utilizes the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (ARW-WRF) dynamic core and the physics suite from the operational Rapid Refresh/High-Resolution Rapid Refresh deterministic modeling system. A goal of HRRRE development is a system with sufficient spread amongst members, comparable in magnitude to the random error in the ensemble mean, to represent the range of possible future atmospheric states. HRRRE member diversity has traditionally been obtained by perturbing the initial and lateral boundary conditions of each member, but recent development has focused on implementing stochastic approaches in HRRRE to generate additional spread. These techniques were tested in retrospective experiments and in the May 2019 Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Experiment (HWT-SE). Results show a 6–25% increase in the ensemble spread in 2-m temperature, 2-m mixing ratio, and 10-m wind speed when stochastic parameter perturbations are used in HRRRE (HRRRE-SPP). Case studies from HWT-SE demonstrate that HRRRE-SPP performed similar to or better than the operational High-Resolution Ensemble Forecast system version 2 (HREFv2) and the non-stochastic HRRRE. However, subjective evaluations provided by HWT-SE forecasters indicated that overall, HRRRE-SPP predicted lower probabilities of severe weather (using updraft helicity as a proxy) compared to HREFv2. A statistical analysis of the performance of HRRRE-SPP and HREFv2 from the 2019 summer convective season supports this claim, but also demonstrates that the two systems have similar reliability for prediction of severe weather using updraft helicity.

Denotes content that is immediately available upon publication as open access.

Corresponding author email address: evan.kalina@noaa.gov
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