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The Common Land Model

Yongjiu Dai
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Xubin Zeng
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Robert E. Dickinson
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Ian Baker
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Gordon B. Bonan
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Michael G. Bosilovich
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A. Scott Denning
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Paul A. Dirmeyer
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Paul R. Houser
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Guoyue Niu
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Keith W. Oleson
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C. Adam Schlosser
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Zong-Liang Yang
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The Common Land Model (CLM) was developed for community use by a grassroots collaboration of scientists who have an interest in making a general land model available for public use and further development. The major model characteristics include enough unevenly spaced layers to adequately represent soil temperature and soil moisture, and a multilayer parameterization of snow processes; an explicit treatment of the mass of liquid water and ice water and their phase change within the snow and soil system; a runoff parameterization following the TOPMODEL concept; a canopy photo synthesis-conductance model that describes the simultaneous transfer of CO2 and water vapor into and out of vegetation; and a tiled treatment of the subgrid fraction of energy and water balance. CLM has been extensively evaluated in offline mode and coupling runs with the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3). The results of two offline runs, presented as examples, are compared with observations and with the simulation of three other land models [the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), Bonan's Land Surface Model (LSM), and the 1994 version of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Atmospheric Physics LSM (IAP94)].

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado

National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland

Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, Maryland

Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Yongjiu Dai, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332, E-mail: dai@eas.gatech.edu

The Common Land Model (CLM) was developed for community use by a grassroots collaboration of scientists who have an interest in making a general land model available for public use and further development. The major model characteristics include enough unevenly spaced layers to adequately represent soil temperature and soil moisture, and a multilayer parameterization of snow processes; an explicit treatment of the mass of liquid water and ice water and their phase change within the snow and soil system; a runoff parameterization following the TOPMODEL concept; a canopy photo synthesis-conductance model that describes the simultaneous transfer of CO2 and water vapor into and out of vegetation; and a tiled treatment of the subgrid fraction of energy and water balance. CLM has been extensively evaluated in offline mode and coupling runs with the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3). The results of two offline runs, presented as examples, are compared with observations and with the simulation of three other land models [the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS), Bonan's Land Surface Model (LSM), and the 1994 version of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Atmospheric Physics LSM (IAP94)].

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona

Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado

National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland

Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, Maryland

Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Yongjiu Dai, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332, E-mail: dai@eas.gatech.edu
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