All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 336 132 10
PDF Downloads 77 27 5

Historical Research in the Atmospheric Sciences: The Value of Literature Reviews, Libraries, and Librarians

David M. Schultz
Search for other papers by David M. Schultz in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author;s experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying the history of science. Three phases of performing literature searches with varying degrees of interaction with a research librarian are considered: do it yourself, librarian assisted, and librarian as collaborator. Examples are given for each phase: occluded fronts, conditional symmetric instability, and static instability terminology, respectively. Electronic availability of information is changing the relationship between scientists and librarians. Yet, despite these changes, books on library shelves and knowledgeable human librarians remain essential to the scientific enterprise.

Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, and NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. David M. Schultz, CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, 1313 Halley Circle, Norman, OK 73069, E-mail: david.schultz@noaa.gov

Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author;s experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying the history of science. Three phases of performing literature searches with varying degrees of interaction with a research librarian are considered: do it yourself, librarian assisted, and librarian as collaborator. Examples are given for each phase: occluded fronts, conditional symmetric instability, and static instability terminology, respectively. Electronic availability of information is changing the relationship between scientists and librarians. Yet, despite these changes, books on library shelves and knowledgeable human librarians remain essential to the scientific enterprise.

Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, and NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. David M. Schultz, CIMMS and NOAA/NSSL, 1313 Halley Circle, Norman, OK 73069, E-mail: david.schultz@noaa.gov
Save