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On the Assessment of Surface Heat Flux and Evaporation Using Large-Scale Parameters

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  • 1 Division of Atmospheric Physics, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Aspendale, Victoria, Australia
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Abstract

In an introductory review it is reemphasized that the large-scale parameterization of the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat is properly expressed in terms of energetic considerations over land while formulas of the bulk aerodynamic type are most suitahle over the sea. A general framework is suggested.

Data from a number of saturated land sites and open water sites in the absence of advection suggest a widely applicable formula for the relationship between sensible and latent heat fluxes.

For drying land surfaces, we assume that the evaporation rate is given by the same formula for evaporation multiplied by a factor. This factor is found to remain at unity while an amount of water, varying from one site to another, is evaporated. Following this a linear decrease sets in, reducing the evaporation rate to zero after a further 5 cm of evaporation, the same at several sites examined.

Abstract

In an introductory review it is reemphasized that the large-scale parameterization of the surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat is properly expressed in terms of energetic considerations over land while formulas of the bulk aerodynamic type are most suitahle over the sea. A general framework is suggested.

Data from a number of saturated land sites and open water sites in the absence of advection suggest a widely applicable formula for the relationship between sensible and latent heat fluxes.

For drying land surfaces, we assume that the evaporation rate is given by the same formula for evaporation multiplied by a factor. This factor is found to remain at unity while an amount of water, varying from one site to another, is evaporated. Following this a linear decrease sets in, reducing the evaporation rate to zero after a further 5 cm of evaporation, the same at several sites examined.

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